Tag Archives: Meat

Starbucks Crushed Beetles – Just the Tip of the Iceberg

4 Apr

I heard today that the CEO of Starbucks has announced they will most likely stop using crushed beetles as a dye for their Strawberry beverages – due to the huge uproar they received.  My immediate (inner monologue) reaction was, “Who cares about little crushed beetles when people are eating beaver anal gland secretions in their ice cream, beef fat in their twinkies, and ammonia in their cheeseburgers?”  Now, I’m not saying beetles deserve to be raised just to be crushed for dye. That’s not cool at all. What I am saying is it’s a lesser evil when considering all the other repulsive additives in our food.  Here are a few of my favorites:

  1. Castoreum, otherwise known as anal secretions mixed with urine from a BEAVER, is a common FDA approved food additive found commonly in vanilla & raspberry flavored candies, drinks, and desserts such as puddings…as well as perfume.

  1. Lanolin, otherwise known as ‘sheep secretions,’ is used in order to soften chewing gum mix.

  1. Ammonia in meat and cheese.  Yes, the same ammonia used to clean ovens and floors.  A hot topic recently with the uproar over what the meat industry calls “finely textured beef” and what a formerU.S. government scientist first called “pink slime”.

  1. Gelatin, which is used to make jello, marshmallows, cream cheese, etc. – is derived from pig & cow skin and bones.

  1. Beef Fat in your hostess treats! That creamy center in your twinkie is made of animal shortening that contains beef

  1. Rennet, which is the fourth stomach of a young cow, is an ingredient in many cheeses.  The production of rennet is disturbing to me: Natural calf rennet is extracted from the inner mucosa of the fourth stomach chamber (the abomasum) of slaughtered young, unweaned calves. These stomachs are a by-product of veal production.  Dried and cleaned stomachs of young calves are sliced into small pieces and then put into saltwater or whey, together with some vinegar or wine to lower the pH of the solution.  GROSS! In theUK, all cheeses are labeled as either suitable or not suitable for vegetarians. In theUnited States and most other countries, people are left to guess about the stomach-content of their cheese.

  1. L-Cysteine is an amino acid used to soften the dough of mass-produced bread. Where does it come from? Human hair. Sometimes duck feathers. About 80% of the L-cysteine on the market comes from human hair (although McDonald’s uses the duck-based variety for its baked goods). Is this technically cannibalism, or just gross?

 

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ALL Red Meat is Bad For You

13 Mar

It is sad but true, ALL red meat is bad for you.  Too long has the American public been brainwashed into believing their bodies need beef to be healthy, when in fact it is quite the opposite.  Consuming any amount of red meat whether it is beef, pork, or lamb, will hasten mortality.

This LA Times article released yesterday is late, but late is better than never.  This is a huge step towards re-educating Americans about what is really healthy.

By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times

March 12, 2012, 4:28 p.m.

Eating red meat — any amount and any type — appears to significantly increase the risk of premature death, according to a long-range study that examined the eating habits and health of more than 110,000 adults for more than 20 years.For instance, adding just one 3-ounce serving of unprocessed red meat — picture a piece of steak no bigger than a deck of cards — to one’s daily diet was associated with a 13% greater chance of dying during the course of the study.Even worse, adding an extra daily serving of processed red meat, such as a hot dog or two slices of bacon, was linked to a 20% higher risk of death during the study.

“Any red meat you eat contributes to the risk,” said An Pan, a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston and lead author of the study, published online Monday in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Crunching data from thousands of questionnaires that asked people how frequently they ate a variety of foods, the researchers also discovered that replacing red meat with other foods seemed to reduce mortality risk for study participants.

Eating a serving of nuts instead of beef or pork was associated with a 19% lower risk of dying during the study. The team said choosing poultry or whole grains as a substitute was linked with a 14% reduction in mortality risk; low-fat dairy or legumes, 10%; and fish, 7%.

Previous studies had associated red meat consumption with diabetesheart disease and cancer, all of which can be fatal. Scientists aren’t sure exactly what makes red meat so dangerous, but the suspects include the iron and saturated fat in beef, pork and lamb, the nitrates used to preserve them, and the chemicals created by high-temperature cooking.

The Harvard researchers hypothesized that eating red meat would also be linked to an overall risk of death from any cause, Pan said. And the results suggest they were right: Among the 37,698 men and 83,644 women who were tracked, as meat consumption increased, so did mortality risk.

In separate analyses of processed and unprocessed meats, the group found that both types appear to hasten death. Pan said that at the outset, he and his colleagues had thought it likely that only processed meat posed a health danger.

Carol Koprowski, a professor of preventive medicine at USC’s Keck School of Medicine who wasn’t involved in the research, cautioned that it can be hard to draw specific conclusions from a study like this because there can be a lot of error in the way diet information is recorded in food frequency questionnaires, which ask subjects to remember past meals in sometimes grueling detail.

But Pan said the bottom line was that there was no amount of red meat that’s good for you.

“If you want to eat red meat, eat the unprocessed products, and reduce it to two or three servings a week,” he said. “That would have a huge impact on public health.”

A majority of people in the study reported that they ate an average of at least one serving of meat per day.

Pan said that he eats one or two servings of red meat per week, and that he doesn’t eat bacon or other processed meats.

Cancer researcher Lawrence H. Kushi of the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research in Oakland said that groups putting together dietary guidelines were likely to pay attention to the findings in the study.

“There’s a pretty strong supposition that eating red meat is important — that it should be part of a healthful diet,” said Kushi, who was not involved in the study. “These data basically demonstrate that the less you eat, the better.”

UC San Francisco researcher and vegetarian diet advocate Dr. Dean Ornish said he gleaned a hopeful message from the study.

“Something as simple as a meatless Monday can help,” he said. “Even small changes can make a difference.”

Additionally, Ornish said, “What’s good for you is also good for the planet.”

In an editorial that accompanied the study, Ornish wrote that a plant-based diet could help cut annual healthcare costs from chronic diseases in the U.S., which exceed $1 trillion. Shrinking the livestock industry could also reduce greenhouse gas emissions and halt the destruction of forests to create pastures, he wrote.

Stickers

27 Jan

Last night I was looking through boxes in my closet and I happened upon a few of my old PETA stickers from the 90’s.  I was a militant vegan back then – forgive me I was a moody teenager – and I loved to slap those stickers all over everything.  Some of them are down right cute, and others….well they are sad.  I want to share some stickers with you, some old and some new.

Cure Yourself

17 Jan

An amazing movie (documentary) claims the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting animal-based and processed foods.  Quit the meat, quit the dairy, and you can cure yourself?  Watch Forks Over Knives.

I am a believer, and I have been since 1997 when I went Vegan.  My sources back then were not as well prepared and entertaining as Forks Over Knives.   This movie is so easy to watch; it flies by.

Myths, old-wives tales, and greed driven propaganda are dispelled so absolutely it will blow your mind.  Degenerative diseases like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and even several forms of cancer, could almost always be prevented, and in many cases reversed, by adopting a whole foods, plant-based diet.   But do you want to believe it?  I bet you don’t, because it’s just too hard….to give up your meat.

(Forks Over Knives is currently showing on HBO, as well as free-streaming on Netflix.)

Wishing you happy enlightenment my friends.  Be good to yourselves.

Meat and Diabetes

6 Jan

The Harvard School of Public Health has released the results of an important study linking processed meat and red meat to Type 2 Diabetes in adults.  What are some of the symptoms of Type 2 Diabetes? Bladder, kidney, skin, or other infections that are more frequent or heal slowly, blurred vision, erectile dysfunction, pain and numbness in feet/hands, increased urination, fatigue, etc. etc.   Are your hot dogs, bologna, hamburgers, salami slices worth having these symptoms?  Over 25 million people in the USA have diabetes, and most have Type 2.  Would you like fries and a soda with your Diabetes???  Eat healthy and get outside my friends.

http://usat.ly/meatandiabetes 

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